Recommendations on Top-Level Dissertation Writing

Even the best students can find their challenge (and possibly downfall) in their dissertation. This, however, does not have to be the outcome if you have the right tips. Follow these recommendations to ensure that your thesis is of the highest quality.

Start with a Unique Idea

In order to impress the board that will be reviewing your dissertation, it is critical that you start with a topic that is your own. You can choose a pre-existing idea or subject, but you should provide new information to the field, complete experiments or trials to repeat or dispute the results, or introduce new ideas or a new way that it can be applied.

Use the Internet to Spark Information

One of the biggest hurdles that you will have to overcome is choosing your topic. You can get help from the Internet in two ways. One option is to look up the latest news in your degree area and find something that interests you and explore it. The other option is to use a web browser to search for dissertation topics in your degree area. Then, put a spin on the topic you choose.

Compose the Abstract After the Rest of the Paper

The abstract is an area placed at the front of your thesis paper. It details many things, including your topic and the reason for choosing it, a brief summary of your methods of research or experimenting, your results, and the conclusions that you have drawn. You must accomplish all of this in 250 words or less in most cases. Instead of composing this first, do it after everything else is completed. This will allow you to get a full picture of your body of work and decide what should be included in the abstract.

Have Someone Else Proofread

You should not proofread your own thesis. You will spend weeks or possibly months working on this writing and research assignment and it will be hard to look at it with non-judgmental eyes. It is best to ask someone who is already familiar with your topic. Consider asking a friend or classmate in the same degree field. You also have the option of asking your professor or another faculty member.